2nd Global Milling Conference, Bangalore, India

Reception for British visitors to VIV & and Global Milling Conference

Calling all British exhibitors and visitors to the up-coming VIV India exhibition and the 2nd Global Milling Conference, both being held in Bangalore next week. The British High Commission in India is arranging a ‘networking reception’ for British exhibitors and visitors on the evening of April 24, 2014 in Bangalore – contact UKTag for more details on: exportsuktag@gmail.com.

The 2nd Global Milling Conference is being held in the Movenpick Hotel and Spa, Bangalore from April 23-24, 2014. Registration can be made at: http://assocom-india.com/gmc/index.php.

 

GRAPAS 2014 Programme

GRAPAS took place last week with over 100 registered attendees in Bangkok, Thailand. Roger Gilbert, owner and publisher of the International Milling Directory again chaired the bi-annual conference. This took place alongside Victam Asia and was also the forum for the GRAPAS award. Rice, wheat and flour milling were all discussed with real enthusiasm and purpose and all reports and feedback has been very positive indeed.0673

 

The programme of the recent conference is below.

 

‘It’s about meeting the growing demand for better food’

VIV Europe 2014 has a strong feed flavour

Feed forms a focal point of VIV Europe 2014. Global developments in the composition and manufacturing of feeds will feature strongly at this international trade show. “We always cover the agribusiness spectrum from feed to meat in every VIV event. But Utrecht in May will underline the feed aspect in several ways,” confirms exhibition manager Ruwan Berculo. “For example, when our visitors arrive at the show they will find that a hall near to the main entrance contains displays by all the leading suppliers of feed manufacturing technology as well as for companies marketing ingredients and additives. A second hall only about a minute away on foot will have more nutritional products on show.”

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Extend automation further into the process

Preliminary calculations tell us that there will be more than 40 exhibitors with machinery or equipment for feed mills. In addition about 15 companies supplying feed manufacturing systems will be represented on the stands forming a special pavilion. In addition global suppliers will shine their light on the profitability and competitiveness of feed manufacturing, by offering a view of how automation can be extended further into the processes of the mill. Ruwan continues: “Everyone in the feed business can gain from the knowledge shared during the various sessions as well as from seeing the innovations at display.“

It is something that has been emphasised repeatedly in the series of VIV Europe Roadshows which travelled around the world to promote the main event this spring. The directors and managers of feed manufacturing companies that attended these Roadshows have already made plans to attend the show in May, because of its strong feed flavour.

Intensification has to be sustainable

“We primarily aim to be a platform for all of the leading technology and know-how in the field of animal protein production in growth countries that currently have the greatest need for this. In addition, we of course also focus our range of solutions on major European countries and the United States in order to achieve even more innovative and higher quality livestock, meat and egg production systems in those countries – all of course with clear preconditions for sustainability because the world has now discovered that intensification has to be sustainable. This is something we are already seeing in the far afield countries, where there is more interest in animal welfare and food safety than you may imagine. Meeting the growing need for animal protein products is not just simply a case of even bigger and more intensive.GITP20100421VIV0515

With the theme of ‘sustainability’ Berculo is alluding to the misconception that this only relates to organic production. “It’s about answering the question about how we can meet the growing demand for better food and how we can develop that in a sustainable manner, throughout the world. What is required for that and meets the latest requirements will be here at the show. We have what has never been on show before, like we’ve promised.”

Attending VIV Europe is free upon registration. Please click here for your free ticket.

VIV Europe 2014

VIV Europe 2014

 

Inspire Forum

The International Milling Directory is pleased to announce a great update from an event chaired by one of its member companies. AB Vista‘s Research Director Mike Bedford provided a great platform for the industry of feed nutrition to expose some great research for knowledge and understanding. A report direct from the forum is below in this post.

 

INSPIRE FORUM HIGHLIGHTS COMPLEX NATURE OF PLANT NSPs AND THE FACTORS THAT INFLUENCE THEIR NUTRITIONAL IMPACT

The inaugural Inspire: Non-starch Polysaccharide (NSP) Forum got underway yesterday with 80 delegates from 23 countries hearing presentations aimed at generating a deeper understanding of the complex structures of plant NSPs and the factors that influence their nutritional impact. It was the first of three sessions across the three days of the Forum looking, respectively at aspects of the NSP substrate, the impact of fibre on animal nutrition and feed enzyme solutions to improve efficacy and sustainability.

Chairing this first session, AB Vista Research Director Mike Bedford highlighted the importance of understanding how NSPs were synthesised and structured when the target was to achieve effective and targeted breakdown using exogenous enzymes.

The process by which cellulose is synthesised was outlined by Dr Staffan Persson of the Max Planck Institute. This was followed by a review of the arabinoxylan structure of cereal grains using a fluorescently-labelled inactivated xylanase by Joran Verspeet of KU Leuven, a technique which also highlighted clear evidence of specificity between different xylanases and different arabionoxylan structures.

Stan Cauvain of Baketran then discussed the experience of the breadmaking industry in using xylanases to overcome the water retaining ability of grain NSPs to maintain bread quality. It was problem that had grown considerably as demand for high fibre wholemeal bread increased during the past 30 years.

Mr Cauvain stated: “The problem is that we have very little idea of why xylanase works in breadmaking. We know how to control the results, but we don’t know exactly what is happening in terms of the interaction between the enzyme and grain quality.”

Mr Cauvain also highlighted the enormous challenge faced by his industry due to the variability in fibre content between flour batches, between flour types and between growing seasons. The inability to reliably predict response to xylanase addition – or the effect of the xylanase inhibitors known to be present in some grains – meant a heavy reliance on extensive and regular trial and error screening, a situation with considerable parallels in the feed industry.

The session closed with a presentation by Dr Per Aman of the Swedish University of Agricultural Science, who discussed the challenges faced when trying to analyse plant fibre.

“None of the methodologies currently used produce exactly the same substrate conditions as found in the animal gut,” he stated. “In terms of the characteristics important to animal nutrition, the molecular structure of the fibre component can be hugely important, as can agronomic conditions.

“For example, the branching on the xylose backbone of arabinoxylan molecules dictates the extent of viscosity effects, as well as how and where xylanases can act to break down those long-chain molecules. Differences between growing sites can also exceed varietal differences, and a detailed knowledge of these factors is essential when looking to understand xylanase activity.”

Those interested in receiving the latest information before and during the forum can follow @inspireforum or the #nspforum hashtag on Twitter. A full list of speakers can be found at inspireforum.com.

Croptech-FeedTech is a hot issue at VIV Europe 2014

This May professionals in milling and processing from around the world finally have the chance to return to their favourite Dutch city for global expo VIV Europe.

Utrecht in The Netherlands boasts a proud history of hosting exhibitions to welcome and inform feed industry executives from around the world. Now Utrecht is preparing to take on that role once again, when the VIV Europe 2014 world expo for poultry and livestock husbandry and processing takes place in this beautiful city from May 20th to May 22nd. A unique trade show where crop and feed technology will play a prominent role.

Special feature: CropTech-FeedTech

For instance a debate on digital engineering at the heart of feed production will take place as well as a major CropTech-FeedTech conference on Wednesday May 21st. Before the conference launches, an open discussion involving all of the participants will commence with short presentations on the digital engineering theme by six global suppliers. Key suppliers who will address automation in all parts of the feed manufacturing chain, from mixing and conveying to pelleting and extrusion.

VIV Europe The developments in this field are progressing so rapidly and are so vital for the production of animal protein that this theme has attracted massive international interest. Exhibition manager Ruwan Berculo explains: “Within the central theme of ‘Sustainable intensification’ the production of animal feeds is essential. The quality of the feed is a spearhead because this has such a massive influence on the quality of the end products for the consumer. The feed component is also a significant factor for the cost price of meat, poultry meat and eggs. The production of high-quality feed is therefore a main topic at VIV Europe. The scientific world is discovering an increasing level of how the production chain can be managed by using technology and automation. It all comes down to the ability to switch quickly between various protein-rich raw materials, depending on price and availability on the world market and tracking and tracing.” At VIV Europe experts and exhibitors will therefore be presenting their best techniques and launch a variety of ground breaking products in this particular field.

VIV Europe

20,000 key players, 140 countries

Berculo concludes: “Visitors will discover the combination of the technology on show and the seminars and congresses that will allow them to gain greater in-depth knowledge. We are expecting 20.000 key players from 140 countries to attend. Many are from Asia, Africa, the Middle East, South America and Russia. In addition entire diplomatic delegations will come to take a look at the world premieres. ” Complete cattle farm complexes and systems which cannot be exhibited at the show because of their size, will be visited via field-trips. Six hundred exhibitors from 45 countries have their latest products set to present to the entire industry. They are ready. Are you?

Attending VIV Europe is free upon registration. Please click here for your free ticket!

IRN set to gather Agri Trading Houses to discuss Emerging Markets this June in Geneva

IRN Event, Geneva, Switzerland

IRN Event, Geneva, Switzerland

The International Milling Directory is pleased to inform our member companies and users about an upcoming event IRN, global summit organiser is pleased to bring you the Risks in Agri Trading: Emerging Markets 2014 Summit taking place in Geneva on 18-19 June.

After hosting three successful editions of the Annual Soft Commodities Trading Summit in Geneva, and launching the inaugural Risks in Agriculture: Emerging Markets in Accra last November; IRN is now back to Geneva with a comprehensive platform designed for General managers, Traders, Treasurers, Supply chain specialists, Trade finance managers, Risk management experts, Operations managers and also Logisticians.

With booming economies, plenty of natural resources and a fantastic margin for growth, emerging markets, such as; Africa, Latin America, South-East Asia, Middle-East are a hub for opportunities within the agri business especially for products such as coffee, cocoa, sugar cane, rubber, grains – the products grown in these areas.

The Senior Experts in the industry will gather to discuss geopolitical risk and legal framework when operating in emerging markets, as well as economic and supply chain risks. From currency and credit risks, to country risk and physical risk. Expert speakers from the major trading companies will consist of; Olam, Cargill, Ecom Trading, Louis Dreyfus, Export Trading Group – and many others – whom will address those challenges by sharing with the audience their experience and best practices to keep those risks to a minimum.

With plenty of room for networking, two workshops, on-stage discussions around essential topics such as credit risk and physical risk management, and specific case studies to shed some light on key emerging regions, the Summit is set to be a very interactive and informative platform.

To register or for further information on the Risks in Agri Trading: Emerging Markets 2014 Summit, please go to http://www.agritradingrisks.com/.

133.6kg/capita – Setting a global benchmark for feed production — Roger Gilbert

Roger Gilbert was invited to participate on the recent round of VIV Roadshows, speaking in Abuja, Nigeria at the beginning of January 2014 and more recently at the IPPE’s VIV Pig Production Summit USA. His topic was: ‘The role of a robust compound feed to meet the needs of a growing world population’ and based on survey results from Alltech’s feed survey showing world production in 2013 at 963 million tonnes. 

Roger Gilbert

Roger Gilbert

Looking at production statistics and population figures in isolation does not provide us with a clear view of where we have come from and where we are likely to end up in a world that is being challenged to feed itself adequately.

Static figures do not encourage us to address issues that are looming.
I’m of the view that information is knowledge, knowledge brings responsibility, and together provides us with influence and power to bring about change. If we ‘know’ we have a responsibility to ‘act’.

Nigeria represents one of the few countries on the planet that is adding substantially and significantly to its population base. In the next decade it is projected by the US Census Bureau to add 50 million people to its current 177 million population base and by 2050 challenge the USA for the third most populated country at just under 400 million people! It’s an issue that our industry, and the food industry in general – both in Nigeria and globally – will have to address.

Nigeria is just one example, an extreme one, of what is likely to happen in developing countries over the next 35 years.

However, there is good news for Africa. From the FAO, and surveying the first 12 years of the 21st century, Africa IS increasing its production of foodstuffs faster than anywhere else on the planet. The area being harvested is increasing at twice the rate of that of any other region while two regions – the Americas and Europe – show no increase in area harvested at all.

Product quality is also improving at the fastest rate in this region while yield increases are matching those being achieved in the America and Asia.

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Nigeria population growth

While world food production growth is increasing on average at 2.1 percent per year, Africa is moving ahead at 3.5 percent – and Nigeria is in amongst the countries achieve these higher-than-average increases.

Food consumption per capita based on an index of 2004-06, shows Africa achieving the fastest and most sustained growth rising from 78kg/head to 117kg/head since 1992.

As we are addressing compound feed production it is interesting to see what is happening to the consumption of meat and eggs. Total food supply has doubled in that period to 1.4 million tonnes and per capita consumption of meat up from 7.4kg/head to almost 9kg/head.

That in fact, highlights the next point I wish to make. How can ‘meat’ supply double yet per head consumption rise by less than 20%? The answer is straightforward – population increase. And that is why grams/day consumption of ‘meat’ products (in protein and fat terms) has largely stagnated in Nigeria since 1997.

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Nigeria population growth

By comparison world food supply has also shown a steady upward trend, increasing by almost 1/5th over a 20 year period.

However, in contrast to that, world per capita consumption has fallen from a high of 151kg on average to 146.5kg. No much you might think in terms of total weight, but the additional population over that period is having an impact and we are likely to see this downward trend continue.

And based on consumption per person, the supply of protein in our diets is showing a steady decline as well. On average we are consuming a gram less protein per person per day. Again not significant you might think, but highlights an ongoing tend that can only accelerate.

Fat consumption on the other hand remains relatively unchanged, at between 5.9-6g/head per day. Possibly reflecting the tremendous increase in palm production throughout Asia over recent decades.

Population pyramids

I want to show here how developing country populations are going to increase – again based on figures from the US Census Bureau. I have compared them to the country I live in – the UK – for comparison. You’ll notice that Nigeria has a wider population base compared to the UK (which given the total difference in numbers, is only natural). Also, the UK shows a ‘bulge’ in the 40-60 year olds groups due in part to the baby boomers following the Second World War. What is also evident is the increased number of people living longer in the UK than their counterparts in Nigeria.

As we move ahead through time – to 2030 – the Nigerian population base has widened by an additional 8-10 million births in the 0-4 age group (with a total of 38 million) while the shape of the pyramid remains the same; and with no more people living longer. In the UK on the other hand the population base has remained largely unchanged while even more people are living longer.

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World food supply

Finally, by 2050, the year in which it’s calculated the world will reach 9.5 billion people on the planet, and before stabalising at around 10 billion for the remainder of the century, Nigeria, while maintaining its pyramid shape, will once more see its population base expand, this time adding almost 70 million people in one-to-four year olds!  Again the UK is largely unchanged with a static population base.

These are in general the two key trends that differenciate between today’s developed countries and those ‘developing’.

Global feed production

I’m basing my comments on the latest Alltech Survey 2013 which provides output figures up until December 2013: the most comprehensive available for our industry worldwide and which we should be grateful to have.

The world currently manufacturers annually just under a billion metric tonnes of compounded or formulated animal feed. These feed statistics were collected by 600 Alltech staff from 130 countries involving 28,196 feedmills. Note: Numbers for less developed countries may be less accurate; but that will have little influence on overall dataset.

The top 10 countries in descending order of output are: China, USA, Brazil, Mexico, Spain, India, Russia, Japan, Germany and France which account for 611 million tonnes or two-thirds of world production.

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global feed
production 2013

Poultry, which includes layers, broilers, turkeys and others, account for 444.4 million tonnes of feeds while pigs account for 242.8 million tonnes and ruminants – dairy, beef, calves and others – 195.6 million tonnes.

Key survey findings include:

  • China leading producer at 189 million tons
  • Asia leading overall region with 348 million
  • US and Brazil 2nd and 3rd largest countries
  • Africa fastest growing region; up 7%
  • Middle East has largest feed mills by annual production

Other key findings:

  • Poultry still the leading species
  • 46% of all feed is poultry feed, 61% of that is for broilers
  • 444.4 million tons fed to poultry worldwide
  • Aqua experienced fastest growth up 17% over 2012 – exceeded 40 million tons.
  • Pig feed production increased 11% (esp. China)
  • Pet food up slightly, Equine up 14%
  • Ruminant feed production declined 20%
  • Decline in both Beef and Dairy
  • Able to switch to forages when grain prices high
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Global feed production 2013

The 16 important countries in terms of feed production are ranked in the bar chart above because I want to make the point that countries producing more feed do not necessarily have more feedmills. In fact, this chart is ranked by countries on the left with the least feed mills to the most on the right. And what is really interesting is that the average production from feedmills is not too dissimilar between countries and between regions at 30,000-60,000 tonnes per year.

A developing country’s prospects

Nigeria ranks 54 out of the 133 countries surveyed, in terms of total formulated feed production at 1.9 million tonnes (this does not include home-produced feeds or feeding straights or unformulated feeds). I’d like to extrapolate some figures from the information presented and raise a question or two for you to ponder.

  1. What are the populations of other countries producing a similar amount of feed to Nigeria?
  2. How much feed is being produced by those countries with similar populations?

The reason I ask these questions is that I believe there is a correlation between the volume of compound feed produced in a country and the ability of that country to feed its population adequately.

And I have identified a ‘benchmark’ that I believe all countries need to exceed in order to claim they are providing the nutritional requirements for their populations.

As FAO and other UN organisations, including their associated NGOs, demonstrate safe and affordable food supply is not the responsibility of those with commercial interests alone to fulfill; there is a need for governments to assume responsibility in ensuring food is produced in volumes that are safe and affordable for all.

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Global feed production 2013

Here, I show Nigeria’s total population in 2014 alongside the volume in tonnes of its compound feed production (just under 2 million tonnes). I’ve compared that to other countries producing approximately two million tonnes of compound feed and show here the populations those countries feed.

If my proposal has any substance, then the people of Bosnia will be enjoying a healthy diet of livestock and fish products than their counterparts in Sweden or Czech Republic. Or they are enjoying healthier incomes from export sales.

When comparing Nigeria’s 177 million population of today with similarly populated countries we can compare their compound feed production; it is quickly evident that Nigeria is faring no better than Bangladesh and is a long way behind a country like Brazil.

For every Nigerian to enjoy the ‘world average’ supply of animal proteins based on compound feed, then the Nigerian Feed Industry has to rise to the challenge and lift production from 1.9 million tonnes to 23.6 million tonnes annually: over a 10-fold increase on what it is producing now.
Give our industry a chance

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Top ten countries

I believe that scientifically-formulated compound feeds offer the solution to this world feeding itself adequately by 2050.

We not only have to meet the future needs of humans arriving on the planet, but we also have to meet the needs of those wanting to improve their diets as they become more economically advanced. On top of that we have to address the one billion people FAO tells us are receiving less food than is required to sustain themselves. That figure has not been diminishing, but increasing in recent years.

You may not believe that growing livestock and fish for protein is the way forward however, growing and consuming cereals and crops has not proven to be the complete answer either. Livestock and fish have many advantages in the production of protein for human consumption over grains and cereals (which we cannot go into here) and we should give this industry a chance to prove itself as it offers huge utilization and conversion efficiencies yet to be fully realized.

Unless we measure where we are we cannot set meaningful ‘benchmarks’ for ourselves or our industry for the future.

Alltech’s figures are the first comprehensive figures the industry has on just how much compounded feed is being produced and used. Based on these figures and our current world population, I put it to you that each country must set an annual benchmark that sees every citizen having access to food that is based on 133.6kg/head of scientifically-formulated compound feed.

After all, that’s the world average and every country should be striving to be equal to or rise above the average in terms of supplying safe and affordable food to its people.

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